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2018 English/Reading/Literature Annual Program Plan ENGL English/Reading/Literature

I.A. Program Profile: PurposeDescribe the program(s) to be reviewed. What is the purpose of the program and how does it contribute to the mission of Skyline College?

Narrative The diverse range of courses offered by the English program--basic, developmental, and transfer-level composition, literature, creative writing, and supplemental writing assistance--provides opportunities for students to sharpen and enhance their reading, writing and critical thinking skills in order to attain their educational, career, and personal goals. Through its core courses, the student-centered program provides a gateway into other college curricula and meets the vast and ever changing needs of the growing global economy. As well, the English curricula emphasizes lifelong learning and social responsibility so that students develop a sense of themselves and gain new social awareness through considering views from different cultural, ethnic, gender, socio-economic, political, and religious backgrounds. By providing a wide range of courses, infusing the curriculum with multiple cultural and political perspectives, and incorporating co-curricular multicultural activities as part of the instruction, the English program responds to the needs and goals of the College’s diverse student population.

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I.B. Program Planning TeamAnnual program planning is intended to be a collaborative process which promotes dialogue and reflection. Please identify all individuals who contributed to or shaped the narrative. Include names and the title or role of each person.

Narrative Participants:

Kathleen Feinblum - APP document coordinator

Rachel Bell - Managed department activities and furnished department activity report.

Zahra Mojtahedi - furnished PRIE data

Michelle Weiss, Jessica Powers and Gregory Christianson - furnished DE comments

Michael Cross - furnished material for General Education Inquiry Team

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II.A. Analysis: Progress on Prior Program Objectives (Goals) and ActivitiesDescribe the progress made on previously established program objectives (goals) including identification of achievements or areas in which further effort is needed. New programs which have not yet established CPR/APP objectives should discuss progress on program implementation or activities.

Narrative Our prior objectives focused on professional development for instructors in order to improve student outcomes. ENGL 105 has been implemented. We are now looking to see if students are able to write college transfer level essays in a shorter amount of time. In Fall 2017-Spring 2018 – we are still doing professional development sessions for new instructors interested in teaching ENGL 105. We have added the following:

• We initiated a process by which professors can visit each other’s classes• We revised our Full-Time/Adjunct mentor program. This includes creating

a mentor guide that includes the Best Practices of mentoring• CTTL presented workshops for adjuncts on how to apply for full-time

teaching jobs.• English Department Rhetoric was made more “click friendly so that writing

instruction would be easier.• Course outlines for Literature and Core Courses are being revised for our

Program Review in Spring 2019. New templates were created whichreflect current practices. The goal is to move curriculum through early inthe Program Review Process so that next academic year can be spent onthe Program Review Document itself.

Associated Objectives

300-Supplemental Instructors

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II.B. Analysis: Program EnvironmentDescribe any recent external or internal changes impacting the program or which are expected to impact the program in the next year. Please include when the specified changes occurred or are expected to occur.

Narrative The English Department did not hire new full-time faculty this year.

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II.C. Analysis: Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs and PSLOs)(1) Instructional Programs Only: Describe what was learned from the assessmentof course SLOs for the current and past year.(2) Student Service Programs Only: If PSLOs are being assessed this year (3-year cycle), describe what was learned. If no assessment was done because thisis an off-cycle year, please state that this item is not applicable.

Narrative See attachment for more comprehensive report on our assessment for Fall 2017

• In Fall 2017, ENGL 100-105 was assessed. We wanted to find outwhether ENGL 105 students reached the same skill level as ENGL 100 atthe end of the semester. We pulled 54 ENGL 100 essays and 54 ENGL105 essays and evaluated them as to thesis, organization, development,use of text and general score. The general average was ENGL 100 – 2.2and ENGL 105 - 1.9.

• Faculty felt that the process was flawed. Our immediate solution is toselect norming sets next Spring to be used in subsequent assessments.

• Details, including our process is on the Assessment Report attachment.The breakdown of data can be found in the Figures from Fall 2017Assessment section.

• ENGL 161-162 Creative Writing and LIT 370 Readings in Literature of theLatino in the United States were up for assessment. ENGL 161-162achieved a 100% success rate using portfolios as the assessmentinstrument. We did not receive assessment data for LIT 370.

Evidentiary Documents

Assessment Report 100-105-F17.docx Copy of ENGL_201603-201708_ALL.xlsx Copy of ENGL_201603-201708_DISTANCE.xlsx Copy of ENGL_201603-201708_FACE_TO_FACE.xlsx Detailed assessment report for ENGL APP F16.docx Figures from Assessment Fall 2017 COMPLETE.xlsx

Associated Objectives

300-Supplemental Instructors

Note: For all Excel and Word documents, please see the Attachments tab within this document.

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III.A. Reflection: Considering Key FindingsConsider the previous analysis of progress achieved, program environment, and course-level SLOs or PSLOs (if applicable). What are the key findings and/or conclusions drawn? Discuss how what was learned can be used to improve the program's effectiveness.

Narrative PRIE Data – General Breakdown Summer 2016-Fall 2017. For details see PRIE Data attached.

Face to Face:

Summer 2016 Spring 2016 Fall 2017 Classes Success

Rate Withdrawal

Rate Success

Rate Withdrawal

Rate Success

Rate Withdrawal

Rate ENGL 828 75.0% 8.3% 66.7% 19.6% 85.3% 1.5% ENGL 846 57.0% 10.0% 60.0% 20.6% 50.7% 22.5% ENGL 105 -- -- 61.6% 16.7% 66.7% 12.6% ENGL 100 65.9% 17.4% 66.0% 14.2% 65.9% 17.2% ENGL 110 79.9% 11.3% 80.5% 11.8% 75.5% 13.8%

Distance Learning– General Breakdown

Summer 2016 Spring 2016 Fall 2017 Classes Success

Rate Withdrawal

Rate Success

Rate Withdrawal

Rate Success

Rate Withdrawal

Rate ENGL 100 56.2% 30.1% 60.0% 27.7% 56.1% 33.3% ENGL 110 40.6% 50.0% 75.3% 20.0% 74.7% 19.8%

What was Learned: Between 100 and 105, there is around 1%-5% difference in the success rate. Withdrawal rate has a 2% difference. The English Department has been discussing the idea of making all of our College Composition classes into ENGL 105. This would give us extra time for instruction and student contact.

ENGL 110 success rates are significantly higher and withdrawal rates are lower because students by then have made a commitment to college and are more experienced.

Distance Learning classes traditionally have lower completion rates, however ENGL 110 students tend to do better probably because they have the maturity for more independent study.

Other PRIE data shows that full-time students are more successful than part-time students

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Evidentiary Documents

Assessment Report 100-105-F17.docx Copy of ENGL_201603-201708_ALL.xlsx Copy of ENGL_201603-201708_DISTANCE.xlsx Copy of ENGL_201603-201708_FACE_TO_FACE.xlsx English Department Accomplishments Summary—Fall 2017.pdf English Success Withdraw rates for APP 2017.docx Figures from Assessment Fall 2017 COMPLETE.xlsx

Associated Objectives

300-Supplemental Instructors

Note: For all Excel and Word documents, please see the Attachments tab within this document.

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III.B. Reflection: ISLOsIf your program participated in assessment of ISLOs this year: (1) What are the findings and/or conclusions drawn?(2) Does the program intend to make any changes or investigate further basedon the findings? If so, briefly describe what the program intends to do.

Narrative No ISLOs were evaluated by English Faculty this academic year

Evidentiary Documents

Critical Thinking ISLO English Sp16.pdf Effective Communication ISLO English for F15.pdf

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IV.A. Strategy for Program Enhancement: Continuation/ModificationIndicate whether the program is continuing implementation of the last CPR strategy or revising the strategy. Please describe the modifications if revisions are intended.

Note: Any new strategies should be linked to Institutional Goals through creation of objectives in the next section. If the program has not yet participated in comprehensive program review, an annual or multi-year strategy can be defined in this item.

Narrative Our program continues to implement the CPR strategies of last year. Below are some enhancements:

• In our assessment, we found that ENGL 105 scores were low. We havenot yet discussed re-calibrating the cut scores and placement policies.

• In the process of program review, which includes redoing our courseoutlines, we are re-examining our content, standardizing our courseoutline format and re-aligning our courses to the C-ID descriptors.

• In Spring of 2018, English Faculty met with librarians to adjust the processof implementing the Information Literacy requirement into our 100/105classes. The increase in ENGL 105 sessions also increased the demandfor workshop appointments. In the meeting, two basic models emerged.1) In the embedded model, a librarian comes into the classroom during thebeginning of the year and introduces basic research concepts and then,during year, the librarian comes back for four additional 15-20 minutesessions. For the “menu” model, the librarian provides a list of skills ofwhich the instructor can choose to implement. Instructors can post thechosen material on his/her Canvas page.

• Faculty will continue their efforts in professional development by havingsmall workshops, continuing the mentoring project and working on thedepartment handbook. However, most of the effort in the coming year willbe dedicated to Program Review.

• Some distance learning instructors have been having trouble with Canvas,mostly due to its quirks. CTTL has provided a chat room where DEinstructors can exchange information and tips.

• The General Education Inquiry Team, part of the larger Design Team, iscurrently proposing a program that develops meaningful, interdisciplinarypathways for general education courses that utilize e-portfolios,

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capstones, and service learning as "high impact practices" in order to help students see the connections between GE and discipline knowledge.

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IV.B. Strategy for Program Enhancement: Action Plan and Resource RequestsBased on the most recent CPR and any desired modifications, develop an annual action plan with related resource requests. No narrative response will be entered in this section, but the objectives you create will be printed automatically in the APP report under this item.

(1) To begin, click on PLANNING at the top of the page, then CREATE A NEW OBJECTIVE. To view previously created objectives, click PLANNING at the top of the page, then VIEW MY OBJECTIVE.(2) IMPORTANT! Make sure to associate each objective to this standard in the APP. Need help? Contact the PRIE Office for further instructions. Institutional Goals.

Narrative See Planning Module

Associated Objectives

399-Professional Development support for new ENGL 105 instructors300-Supplemental Instructors

Budget and Objectives of English/Reading/Literature Department

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Objectives of English/Reading/Literature DepartmentPlanning Year: 2018-2019

Planning Year: 2018-2019

Unit Code Planning Unit Unit Manager

2413ENGL00 English/Reading/Literature Feinblum, Kathleen

Objective Status: New/In Progress

300 Supplemental Instructors

The English Department would like to have more Supplemental Instructors in all levels of classes. We find that the success rates go up because SIs are able to offer more assistance to struggling students.

399 Professional Development support for new ENGL 105 instructors

The English department is expanding the ENGL 105 classes in order to get more developmental students into the college transfer level. So far, our "stacked" 105/846 classes have shown that a significant number of students can bypass the developmental course and finish the ENGL 100/105 requirements thus eliminating one exit point. However we continue to need workshops for instructors new to this challenge. The cost of this service includes release time for the workshop coordinator and food for the participants..

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Communication Studies Assessing the Effective

Communication ISLO: Fall 2015

Source: Office of Research, Planning, and Institutional Effectiveness

Students will be able to communicate and comprehend effectively.

Effective communication includes the ability to:

1) comprehend, analyze, and respond appropriately to oral, written, and other sensory information.

2) effectively express ideas through speaking and writing.

Assessment Methodology

Three faculty member assessed two sections of ENGL 100 (Composition), and four sections of 110 (Composition, Literature and Critical Thinking), after participating in two workshops, one on teaching strategies to facilitate effective communication and one norming session on how to evaluate student work with the rubric.

These faculty members assessed 155 students’ work.

The PRIE office aggregated results for discussion.

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ENGLISH

Assignment Fulfillment Comprehension

Analysis and Audience

Organization and Audience

Excellent 73 57 41 65

Good 55 56 58 59

Adequate 20 33 39 19

Needs Work 7 9 17 12

N (excluding not measured) 155 155 155 155

47%37%

26%

42%

35%

36%

37%

38%

13%21%

25%

12%

5% 6%

11%

8%

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

Assignment Fulfillment Comprehension Analysis and Audience Organization and Audience

ENGLISH

Excellent Good Adequate Needs Work

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ISLO: EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION (2011)

Needs Work Adequate Good Excellent

Assignment Fulfillment

Completed assignment

is off-topic and/or fails

to fulfill the directives.

Completed assignment

is on-topic but fails to

fulfill some of the

directives.

Completed assignment

is on-topic and fulfills

most of the directives.

Completed assignment

is on-topic and fulfills all

directives.

Comprehension

Student does not relate

the message to his or

her own framework/

existing knowledge,

summarizes

inaccurately, or fails to

mention the message.

Student integrates the

message into his or her

own frame of reference/

existing knowledge.

Student’s knowledge of

the subject is generally

accurate, though flawed

or in the words of the

original source.

Student develops a

framework for

organizing the message

and relating it to his or

her own frame of

reference/ existing

knowledge.

Student’s knowledge of

the subject is accurate

throughout except with

minor details, and is in

his or her own words.

Student develops a

framework for

organizing the message

and relating it to his or

her own frame of

reference/ existing

knowledge or broader

context/ larger world

perspective.

Student’s knowledge of

the subject is accurate

throughout, and is in his

or her own words.

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Analysis and Audience Student generally lacks

an awareness of the

reader, for the discussion

lacks evidence,

illustrations, other

definitive details and/or

reasonable follow-up

explanations. Analysis

shows undeveloped

observational skills.

Student makes some

attempt to provide

evidence, illustrations, or

other definitive details to

convince the audience,

but some information is

either extraneous or

insufficient. Analysis

shows reasonable

observational skills.

Explanations and uses of

evidence, illustrations, or

other definitive details

generally convince the

audience. Analysis

reflects good

observational skills.

Explanations and

sophisticated/ original

uses of evidence,

illustrations, or other

definitive details

effectively convince the

audience. Analysis

reflects highly developed

observational skills.

Organization and

Audience

Opening comments are

inappropriate, or are

unlikely to engage the

audience; provides little

or no focus or order to

the material; closes

abruptly, either with no

apparent concluding

statement or with

inappropriate remarks.

Opening comments

attempt to reveal the

purpose and major points

and engage the

audience, but the

approach seems

somewhat artificial,

weak, or unimaginative;

provides some focus or

order to the material, but

the structure is

somewhat unclear or

awkward; concluding

comments relate to the

purpose and major

points, but they either

bring in extraneous

information or are

unnecessarily redundant.

Opening comments

attempt to reveal the

purpose and major

points and engage the

audience; focuses and

orders the materials to

convey a generally

unified point or effect,

and provides movement

within and between

major points and from

beginning to end;

concluding comments

are appropriate and

relate to the purpose and

major points, but they

are not very strong or

emphatic.

Opening comments

attempt to reveal the

purpose and major points

and engage the

audience; focuses and

orders the material to

convey a unified point or

effect, and provides clear

and consistent

movement within and

between major points

and from beginning to

end; concluding

comments are strong

both in reemphasizing

the purpose and major

points and in leaving the

audience with an

appropriate closing

statement.

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Questions to Consider

1) In what areas did students perform well? For instance, consider which criteria

have the highest number of “excellent” and “good” scores.

2) In what areas did students struggle? For instance, which criteria have the highest

number of “needs work” and/or “adequate” scores?

3) Speculate as to why students did well. Consider questions such as the following:

what prior knowledge did students possess that may have been relevant to

completing the assignment and that you tapped into? how does the assignment

effectively enable students to apply the knowledge they acquire from the class

and the text(s)? what class activities may have helped to prepare them to

complete the assignment?

4) Speculate as to why students struggled. Among questions to consider are the

following: what about the assignment can be clarified and/or otherwise improved

upon? what class activities can be implemented and/or improved upon to help

students complete the assignment?

5) Explore to what extent the assignment is well suited for a culminating activity in

your class. For instance, does the assignment require them to apply a range of

knowledge and skills acquired in the class? Does it serve as an accurate means

to evaluate how well students are fulfilling the SLO(s)?

6) Given your “hunches” in your responses to #3 through #5, what do you plan to

change, if anything? What can you do to reinforce or improve learning and why?

a. Continue doing what you’re already doing?

b. Revise how you convey the information?

c. Revise the assignment/ task?

d. Provide more opportunities for practice and feedback?

e. Revise assessment methodology?

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Budget and Objectives of English/Reading/Literature Department

Budget Account #: 2413ENGL00-- Planning Unit Code: 2413ENGL00 Unit Manager: Feinblum, Kathleen

Budget Account: English/Reading/Literature Planning Unit: English/Reading/Literature Planning Year:2018-2019

Requested

GL Code Description Qty Cost Amount Objective Title Task Description

1258 - COORDINATORS Supplemental Instructions $15,000 Supplemental Instructors We currently have SIs for some of our classes. The budget and training for SIs come from the Learning Center. Instructors identify students who have completed the course with a B or higher and who have good personal skills to work with struggling students. The next semester, the SIs are given a particular class with a particular instructor. The SIs function in the classroom is refined through meetings between the SI and instructor.

The funds would go toward paying Supplemental Instructors for the coming Academic Year

1495 - OTHR CERT SAL $25,500 is for stipends so that adjunct professors can attend the professional development workshops. Many of our ENGL 105 instructors are adjunct professors yet their salary does not cover activities outside the class time. Currently ENGL 105 has the highest retention/success rate and this is largely due to teaching training not only for full-timers but for our part-timers as well.

$25,500 Professional Development support for new ENGL 105 instructors

We already have the ENGL 105 training in progress. The resources are to continue this program especially as we are constantly getting new adjuncts into our department.

4510 - MISC SUPPLIES The request is for food to be provided during our all day ENGL 105 workshops. We hold 3 workshops per semester. We want to keep instructors during the whole session which run from 8:30-3:30 so they can discuss workshop concepts and work on projects without interruption.

$3,500 Professional Development support for new ENGL 105 instructors

We already have the ENGL 105 training in progress. The resources are to continue this program especially as we are constantly getting new adjuncts into our department.

Total for 2413ENGL00-- English/Reading/Literature: $44,000

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From: Bell, Rachel K.To: Silva, Paula; Kucera, Lara; Bell, Rachel K.; Belluomini, Jessica; Benavides, Denise; Bowsher, Jim; Buckley, Alissa;

Burns, Grace; Calavitta, John Paul; Cantu, Jorey; Christensen, Gregory; Cross, Michael; Erpelo, Liza; Feinblum,Kathleen; Feiner, Jarrod; Floro, Nina L.; Fredericks, Taylor; Garcia, Marcos; Ghan, Courtney; Gibson, Christopher;Harer, Katharine E.; Hein, Linda; Iles, Monique; Jimenez, Sarah; Jones, Nathan; Kaplan-Biegel, Nancy A.;Knowlton, Ashley; Lachmayr, Lucia; McClung, Kathleen; Murphy, Andrew; Powers, Jessica; Powers, Vanessa;Rueckhaus, Paul; Sandel, Adam; Sapigao, Janice; Walsh, John; Weiss, Michelle; Williams, Rob; Zollo, Peter;Zoughbie, Susan

Cc: Gutierrez, Mary; Ruiz, Kennya; Thigpen, MarisaSubject: English Department Accomplishments Summary—Fall 2017Date: Wednesday, December 20, 2017 10:12:33 PM

Hello English folks,

I hope this finds you finished or at least getting close to finishing reading/grading yourmountain of final essays :). As you head into your well-deserved break, below is a list of theadditional projects we got done this semester through the English Coordinator component. Such amazing work and it was really a pleasure working with you guys on these projects, and itlooks like we are well on track for English Program Review next year.

English Department Accomplishments Summary—Fall 2017

Team Adjunct& ColleagueConnections:

Members:Nathan, Rob,John, Jim,Jarrod, Denise,Nina, Monique,and Rachel

(1) The first ever all-division informal class visits wereinstituted! There were 16 participants from nearly everydepartment in the Language Arts:https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1xtkYiDKAX-dZzI2onvJf3UWUUXYYd0f6l_FyTHw7iTY/edit#gid=0 (2) At the September 2017 Language Arts Division meeting, weshared the “Division-Wide Best Practices” section fromthe Language Arts Orientation that this group created duringsummer 2017. We went over the different sections of the BestPractices: retention, first-day class activities, syllabi and studentsfirst. There was a lot of interest and discussion around syllabibest practices, so we decided to devote part of the next LanguageArts Division meeting to a hands-on activity centering on syllabi.

(3) We revised the “Prompt Writing” and “Providing QualityFeedback” sections of the “English Best-Practices” section inthe Language Arts Orientation based on hands-on work done intwo different English meetings.

(4) We strengthened our English Mentor Program and John,Jim, Monique, Jarrod and Rachel all met and created a MentorGuide that created two things: (a) a team of Mentor Advisors who

mailto:/O=EXCHANGELABS/OU=EXCHANGE ADMINISTRATIVE GROUP (FYDIBOHF23SPDLT)/CN=RECIPIENTS/CN=5139B51603B74EA8BF8A4075D09321AF-BELL, RACHEL K.

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would lead group gatherings and pairings and (b) We created aBest Practices guide including: a mentor menu (mentees canchoose from); guidance on “making the match”; getting started;and suggested meeting topics for mentors/mentees: EnglishDepartment Mentor Guide.

(5) At the November 2017 Language Arts meeting, we had a 30-minute hands-on activity to revise the Division syllabustemplate, and the work was carried on in the online CanvasLanguage Arts space and a new revised Division SyllabusTemplate was created.

(6) Also, this group asked about providing materials and adviceon getting hired full-time. Nina Floro, who has presented onthis through the CTTL, made available a helpfulPowerPoint: “Unraveling the Mystery of the Full-Time FacultyJob Application Process” and I also posted this in our onlineLanguage Arts Canvas space.

Revising theRhetoric:

IMPROVEMENTS/REVISIONS MADE TOTHE RHETORIC DURING FALL 2017:

(1) It is now more click-friendly!On the main Rhetoric menu page, you can now click directly on any section,specific page, or PowerPoint:http://accounts.smccd.edu/skyenglish/

You’ll also find that within the Rhetoric .pdf, the table of contents is “clickable”as are the contents on each individual chapter.

(2) Easy to bookmark, send assignment links,and download blank forms:

Link to a specific page—replace the yellow highlighted section ?? below withthe target page number:http://accounts.smccd.edu/skyenglish/rhetoric.pdf#page=??Link to a specific chapter—from the main menu, click on any of the colored

number-squares to go to chapter sub-menus and downloadable formsstudents can complete, save and turn in. For example, you can give your studentsa link to the chapter on Outlining and from this sub-menu there are 2 formsstudents can download andcomplete: http://accounts.smccd.edu/skyenglish/4Outlining.htm

(3) Updated MLA Guidelines to reflect the new8th edition Work Cited changes:How to cite texts has changed significantly in the new 8th MLA styleguidelines. The current system is based on a few principles, rather than an

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extensive list of specific rules. There is now a list of 9 core elements to consultto create a text citation. You can go over this with students using the .pdf or thePowerPoint: http://accounts.smccd.edu/skyenglish/5MLA.htm.

(4) Thesis chapter now has 16 text-basedstudent thesis examples:There is now an interactive exercise you can assign students or work on togetherin class that has students examine actual text-based student thesis statements (8 inresponse to non-fiction and 8 is response to fiction: poetry, short stories, playsand novels). Students can use these as models and also to identify the elementsof a complex thesis: TOPIC + OPINION + SO WHAT?http://accounts.smccd.edu/skyenglish/rhetoric.pdf#page=203

(5) Literature essay examples now includedThe Rhetoric has an example of an essay based on non-fiction, but now it alsohas two model student essays based on fiction. In each of these essays, the thesisstatements are underlined and the topic sentences are in bold, so it is visuallyeasy to see how the essays are unified, and each body paragraph models the PIEparagraph approach.

Sample student paper analyzing a short story:http://accounts.smccd.edu/skyenglish/rhetoric.pdf#page=302

Sample student paper analyzing a poem: http://accounts.smccd.edu/skyenglish/rhetoric.pdf#page=312

(6) Be sure to order your new desk-copyFor spring 2018, only the updated version of the Rhetoric will be available forpurchase, so if you are using a print version, be sure to ask Kevin Chak in thebookstore for a desk-copy: [emailprotected]

Team EnglishCourseOutlines:

Members:Kathleen, Liza,Chris, andRachel

We dedicated two of the Fall English meetings to vetting the coreEnglish and Literature course outline templates and thenorganizing sign-ups to revise all these course outlines based onthe more streamlined and revised templates.

LITERATURE COURSE REVISIONS: Before Spring 2018, we plan to revise the Literature coursesbased on the template we created as a department. Hereare directions, sign-ups and the template being used.

Literature Course RevisionsSign-Up

1. LIT. 101 Contemporary Literature - Michael C.

2. LIT. 151 Introduction to Shakespeare – Nina F.

mailto:[emailprotected]

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3. LIT. 154 Queer Literature – John C. and Rob W.

4. LIT. 155 The Graphic Novel – Liza E

5. LIT. 156 Science Fiction and Fantasy Literature – John C.

6. LIT. 191 Children's Literature – Michael C.

7. LIT. 201 American Literature I – John C.

8.LIT.202AmericanLiteratureII-Jessica

9.LIT.220IntroductiontoWorldLiteratureI–ChrisGNote:Icanhelpwithworldlit.IdesignedthefirstworldlitcourseoutlineandIteachalotofinternationallit.–KathleenF.

10.LIT.221IntroductiontoWorldLiteratureII–ChrisG.

11.LIT.231SurveyofBritishLiteratureI-MoniqueI.andLuciaL.

12.LIT.232SurveyofBritishLiteratureII–JimB.

13.LIT.251WomeninLiterature–KathleenF.

14.LIT.265AsianAmericanLiterature–NinaF.

15.LIT.266BlackLiterature–NathanJ.

16.LIT.267FilipinoAmericanLiterature–LizaE.

17.LIT.277FilmandLiterature-JarrodF.

18.LIT.370ReadingsinLiteratureoftheLatinointheUnitedStates–LuciaL.

19.LIT.432Folklore–JohnC.

CORE ENGLISH COURSE REVISIONS: Before Fall 2018, we plan to revise the Core English coursesbased on the template we created as a department. Hereare directions, sign-ups and the template being used. We alsofound out we can revise the writing page count and that we shouldadd a reading page count for each course. See this document formore detailed breakdowns on proposed writing and reading pagecounts. It was also suggested that we create reading and writingpage counts for our Literature courses.

Core English Course Revisions Sign-Up: English 828: Jarrod and Rachel

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English 846: Jessica B. and LizaEnglish 100/105: Chris, Lucia, Andrew, Nathan, RobEnglish 110: Jim, Michael, JohnEnglish 165: Kathleen

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Assessing the Critical Thinking ISLO: Spring 2016

Source: Office of Research, Planning, and Institutional Effectiveness

Students will be able to demonstrate critical thinking skills in problem solving across the disciplines and in daily life.

Critical thinking includes the ability to:

Support claims with relevant and credible evidence.

Respond to bias; be fair-minded.

Apply accurate and logical analysis to achieve desired outcome.

Assessment Methodology

Six faculty member assessed three sections of ENGL 100 (Composition), one section of 105 (Intensive Composition and Reading), one section of 110 (Composition, Literature and Critical Thinking), and one section of 165 (Critical Thinking and Advanced Composition), after participating in two workshops, one on teaching strategies to facilitate effective communication and one norming session on how to evaluate student work with the rubric. One of the sections was taught online, and another a hybrid of online and face-to-face.

These faculty members assessed 89 students’ work.

The PRIE office aggregated results for discussion.

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34% 35% 31%25% 25%

33%40%

33%

47%36%

26% 27%20%

33%

7%

27%

41% 42%

35%35%

43% 28%23% 31%

23%

16%30%

35%40%

30%

27%

27%

16% 13%

15% 25%

27%32%

21%23% 14%

21%

32% 19%28% 25%

40%

27%

9% 10%19%

14%4% 7%

17% 13% 16%28%

13%19%

12% 12%

27%20%

0%

10%

20%

30%

40%

50%

60%

70%

80%

90%

100%

ENGLISH

Consistently Usually Sometimes Rarely

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ENGLISH

Support: Relevant Evidence

Support: Accurate

Interpretation

Support: Standards

of Evidence

Support: Multiple Credible Sources

Bias: Unbiased Evidence

Bias: No Emotionally

Loaded Language

Bias: Facts/Opinions Discrimination

Bias: Justification

Based on Ideology

Bias: Opposing

Views

Bias: Open

Minded

Consistently 27 17 8 20 17 23 19 16 20 21

Usually 32 20 9 28 29 19 11 15 10 9

Sometimes 13 6 4 20 18 22 10 11 6 12

Rarely 7 5 5 11 3 5 8 6 7 16

N (excluding not measured)

79 48 26 79 67 69 48 48 43 58

Not Measured 10 41 63 10 22 20 41 41 46 31

ENGLISH (CONTINUED)

Analysis: Conclusions Supported

Analysis: Inductively/ Deductively

Strong

Analysis: Theory and Application

Analysis: Logical

Connections

Analysis: Inconsistencies

Examined

Analysis: Hypotheses

Testing

Consistently 12 7 5 22 1 4

Usually 14 9 10 20 4 4

Sometimes 15 5 7 17 6 4

Rarely 6 5 3 8 4 3

N (excluding not measured)

47 26 25 67 15 15

Not Measured 42 63 64 22 74 74

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ISLO: EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION (2011)

Needs Work Adequate Good Excellent

Assignment Fulfillment

Completed assignment

is off-topic and/or fails

to fulfill the directives.

Completed assignment

is on-topic but fails to

fulfill some of the

directives.

Completed assignment

is on-topic and fulfills

most of the directives.

Completed assignment

is on-topic and fulfills all

directives.

Comprehension

Student does not relate

the message to his or

her own framework/

existing knowledge,

summarizes

inaccurately, or fails to

mention the message.

Student integrates the

message into his or her

own frame of reference/

existing knowledge.

Student’s knowledge of

the subject is generally

accurate, though flawed

or in the words of the

original source.

Student develops a

framework for

organizing the message

and relating it to his or

her own frame of

reference/ existing

knowledge.

Student’s knowledge of

the subject is accurate

throughout except with

minor details, and is in

his or her own words.

Student develops a

framework for

organizing the message

and relating it to his or

her own frame of

reference/ existing

knowledge or broader

context/ larger world

perspective.

Student’s knowledge of

the subject is accurate

throughout, and is in his

or her own words.

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Analysis and Audience Student generally lacks

an awareness of the

reader, for the discussion

lacks evidence,

illustrations, other

definitive details and/or

reasonable follow-up

explanations. Analysis

shows undeveloped

observational skills.

Student makes some

attempt to provide

evidence, illustrations, or

other definitive details to

convince the audience,

but some information is

either extraneous or

insufficient. Analysis

shows reasonable

observational skills.

Explanations and uses of

evidence, illustrations, or

other definitive details

generally convince the

audience. Analysis

reflects good

observational skills.

Explanations and

sophisticated/ original

uses of evidence,

illustrations, or other

definitive details

effectively convince the

audience. Analysis

reflects highly developed

observational skills.

Organization and

Audience

Opening comments are

inappropriate, or are

unlikely to engage the

audience; provides little

or no focus or order to

the material; closes

abruptly, either with no

apparent concluding

statement or with

inappropriate remarks.

Opening comments

attempt to reveal the

purpose and major points

and engage the

audience, but the

approach seems

somewhat artificial,

weak, or unimaginative;

provides some focus or

order to the material, but

the structure is

somewhat unclear or

awkward; concluding

comments relate to the

purpose and major

points, but they either

bring in extraneous

information or are

unnecessarily redundant.

Opening comments

attempt to reveal the

purpose and major

points and engage the

audience; focuses and

orders the materials to

convey a generally

unified point or effect,

and provides movement

within and between

major points and from

beginning to end;

concluding comments

are appropriate and

relate to the purpose and

major points, but they

are not very strong or

emphatic.

Opening comments

attempt to reveal the

purpose and major points

and engage the

audience; focuses and

orders the material to

convey a unified point or

effect, and provides clear

and consistent

movement within and

between major points

and from beginning to

end; concluding

comments are strong

both in reemphasizing

the purpose and major

points and in leaving the

audience with an

appropriate closing

statement.

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Questions to Consider

1) In what areas did students perform well? For instance, consider which criteria

have the highest number of “excellent” and “good” scores.

2) In what areas did students struggle? For instance, which criteria have the highest

number of “needs work” and/or “adequate” scores?

3) Speculate as to why students did well. Consider questions such as the following:

what prior knowledge did students possess that may have been relevant to

completing the assignment and that you tapped into? how does the assignment

effectively enable students to apply the knowledge they acquire from the class

and the text(s)? what class activities may have helped to prepare them to

complete the assignment?

4) Speculate as to why students struggled. Among questions to consider are the

following: what about the assignment can be clarified and/or otherwise improved

upon? what class activities can be implemented and/or improved upon to help

students complete the assignment?

5) Explore to what extent the assignment is well suited for a culminating activity in

your class. For instance, does the assignment require them to apply a range of

knowledge and skills acquired in the class? Does it serve as an accurate means

to evaluate how well students are fulfilling the SLO(s)?

6) Given your “hunches” in your responses to #3 through #5, what do you plan to

change, if anything? What can you do to reinforce or improve learning and why?

a. Continue doing what you’re already doing?

b. Revise how you convey the information?

c. Revise the assignment/ task?

d. Provide more opportunities for practice and feedback?

e. Revise assessment methodology?

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